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Research Interests

CV

Publications


 

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Nathan, Ran nathanPhD

Full Professor

Berman Building, rooms 102 (office), 101 (lab)
Tel: +972-(0)2-6584314
Fax: +972-(0)2-6584757
E-mail:

Mailing address:
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904
Israel

 Short CV [PDF]

Major Research Interests

Movement ecology, bird migration, animal foraging, seed dispersal, long-distance dispersal, biological aerial
transport processes, navigation, plant-animal interactions, mechanistic modeling, plant recruitment.

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Education


B.Sc in Biology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1989-1992)

Ph.D. in Ecology, Dept of Evolution, Systematics and Ecology, HUJ (1994-2000).

Post-Doctoral Fellow and Research Associate, Dept Ecol. and Evol. Biol., Princeton Univ., USA (1999-2001).


Employment



Ben Gurion University of the Negev: Lecturer (2001), Senior Lecturer (2003).

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem: Senior Lecturer (2003), Associate Professor (2005), Full Professor (2009).

Selected professional activities



Invited keynote speaker, 13 international conferences and 61 institutional seminars/ lecture series
in Australia, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Panama, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK
and USA.


Research Associate, Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst (STRI), Republic of Panama

General Board Member; The Jerusalem Botanical Gardens, Jerusalem, Israel.

Editorial Board Member; Ecology Letters (first ranked research journal in ISI’s Environment/Ecology category);
Invited editor of four Special Features in international scientific journals; long-distance dispersal
(Ecology 2003,Diversity & distributions 2005), plant dispersal (J Ecology 2008) and movement ecology (PNAS 2008).


Ranked 202 in the ISI Essential Science Indicators list (last update: July 1st, 2011), among ~339,000 scientists that have published in the Environment/Ecology field during the last 10 years; 1773 citations (for 36 ISI papers published in this period), 49.25 citations/paper; 5 publications currently classified as “Highly-Cited”.


Initiator and group leader, Movement Ecology Group (International Research Group at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Jerusalem, 2006-2007). Principal Organizer; The First International Conference on Movement Ecology, Jerusalem, Israel, June 2007; Two symposia in the annual meetings of the Ecological Society of America (ESA); and four symposia in other international conferences.

Principal Advisor: current: 7 PhD & 4 MSc students, 1 post-doc; past: 3 PhD & 6 MSc students, 1 post-doc.

Elected Chair, Dept of Evolution, Systematics and Ecology, The Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (2007-2009).

Elected Chairman, The A. Silberman Inst. of Life Sciences, The Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (2009-present).

Elected Senate Member, The Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (2010-present).

Selected fellowships and awards

Adelina and Massimo Della Pergola Chair of Life Sciences (2011)
International Collaboration Award, Australian Research Council (2011)
The Friedrich W. Bessel Award, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany (2006).
The Yoram Ben-Porath Prize for Outstanding Young Researcher, HUJ (2005).

Selected research grants  (overall raised 7.10 million USD in 29 research grants, 1999-present)


The US National Science Foundation (NSF DEB 0453665). R. Nathan (lead-PI); 3 years; Total: 444,791 USD.

The Israeli Science Foundation, 4 funded project (ISF 474/2002, 1316/2005, 150/2007, 1259/2009). R. Nathan
(PI) in 3 of the 4 projects; 3-4 years each project; Total: 806,842 USD.

The US-Israel Binational Science Foundation: 3 funded projects (BSF 229/2002, 124/2004, 255/2008).
R. Nathan (PI); 2-4 years each project; Total: 388,000 USD.

The German-Israel Foundation: two funded projects (GIF 2006/2000, 999/2008). R. Nathan (PI); 1-3 years each
project; Total: 228,700 Euro.

German-Israeli Project Cooperation (DIP NA 846/1-1). R. Nathan (lead-PI); 5 years. Total: 1,650,000 Euro.

Minerva Research Center, Movement Ecology (lead PI) ranked 1/104 proposals from all scientific disciplines;
6(+6) years; Total: 900,000 Euro for each 6 year period.


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Publications


As of 4 August 2011, published 74 peer-reviewed publications, including 60 journal articles, 10 invited book chapters and 4 invited proceeding chapters. Of the 60 journal papers, 48 (80%) were published in high-ranked journals (Impact Factor > 4), including top multidisciplinary journals (1 in Nature, 1 in Science, 6 in PNAS, 1 in BioScience, 2 in Proc Roy Soc B) and top ecological journals (including 3 in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 3 in Ecology Letters, 1 in Annual Reviews of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 3 in Molecular Ecology, 3 in The American Naturalist, 8 in Ecology and 10 inJournal of Ecology). Total number of citations in ISI: 3104, H-index: 29.


Last update: 04-August-2011


Full pulication list [PDF]

1) Editorship of collective volumes (peer-reviewed)
4
Nathan, R. (Ed.) 2008. Movement Ecology. Special Feature in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105; 19050-19125.

3
Bullock, J. M., and R. Nathan. (Eds.) 2008. Plant dispersal across multiple scales: linking models and reality. Special Issue in Journal of Ecology 96; 567-697.

2 Nathan, R. (Ed.) 2005. New perspectives on long-distance dispersal. Special Issue in Diversity & Distributions 11: 125-181. [Free Web Access]

1 Cain, M. L, R. Nathan, and S. A. Levin. (Eds.) 2003. Long-distance dispersal. Special Feature in Ecology 84: 1943-2020.

2) Peer-reviewed articles in international scientific journals
74
Nathan, R., O. Spiegel, S. Fortmann-Roe, R. Harel, M. Wikelski, and W. M. Getz. (201X). Using tri-axial acceleration data to identify behavioral modes of free-ranging animals: general concepts and tools illustrated for Griffon Vultures. Journal of Experimental Biology invited contribution, accepted pending minor revision.

73
Nathan, R., E. K. Klein, J. J. Robledo-Arnuncio, and E. Revilla. (201X). Dispersal kernels: review. Pages xxx-xxx in J. Clobert, M. Baguette, T. G. Benton, and J. M. Bullock, editors. Dispersal and Spatial Evolutionary Ecology. Oxford University Press, Oxford invited review chapter, accepted pending minor revision.

72
Spiegel, O., and R. Nathan. (2011). Empirical evaluation of directed dispersal and density-dependent effects across successive recruitment phases. Journal of Ecology in press

71
Tsoar, A., R. Nathan*, Y. Bartan, A. Vyssotski, G. Dell'Omo, and N. Ulanovsky*. (2011). Large-scale navigational map in a mammal. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America in press (*equal contribution)

70
Buchmann, C. M., F. M. Schurr, R. Nathan, and F. Jeltsch. (2011). Movement upscaled – the importance of individual foraging movement for community response to habitat loss. Ecography in press

69
Steinitz, O., D. Troupin, G. G. Vendramin, and R. Nathan. (2011). Genetic evidence for a Janzen-Connell recruitment pattern in reproductive offspring of Pinus halepensis trees. Molecular Ecology in press [highlighted in News & Views in this journal] [PDF]

68
Sapir, N., N. Horvitz, M. Wikelski, R. Avissar, I. Mahrer, and R. Nathan. (2011). Migration by soaring or flapping: numerical atmospheric simulations reveal that turbulence kinetic energy dictates bee-eater flight mode. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences in press

67
Sapir N, M. Wikelski, R. Avissar, and R. Nathan. (2011). Timing and flight mode of departure in migrating European bee-eaters in relation to multi-scale meteorological processes. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 65:1353–1365. [PDF]

66
Nathan R., G. G. Katul, G. Bohrer, A. Kuparinen, M. B. Soons, S. E. Thompson, A. Trakhtenbrot, and H. S. Horn. (2011). Mechanistic models of seed dispersal by wind. Theoretical Ecology 4:113–132. [PDF]

65
Nathan R., N. Horvitz, Y. He, A. Kuparinen, F. M. Schurr, and G. G. Katul. (2011). Spread of North-American wind-dispersed trees in future environments. Ecology Letters 14:211-219. [PDF]

64
Hedesntröm A., M. Bowlin, R. Nathan, B. Nolet, and M. Wikelski. (2011). Mechanistic principles of locomotion performance in migrating animals. Pages 35-51 in: Fryxell JM, Milner-Gulland EJ, Sinclair ARE (eds) Animal Migration: a synthesis. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

63
Buchmann, C. M., F. M. Schurr, R. Nathan, and F. Jeltsch. (2011). An allometric model of home range formation explains the structuring of animal communities exploiting heterogeneous resources. Oikos 120:106-118. [PDF]

62
Tsoar A., Shohami D., and R. Nathan. (2011) A movement ecology approach to study seed dispersal and plant invasion: an overview and application of seed dispersal by fruit bats. Pages 103-119 in: Richardson DM (ed) Fifty years of invasion ecology: the legacy of Charles Elton. Wiley-Blackwell, London. [PDF]

61
Sapir N., Wikelski M., McCuem M. D., Pinshow B., and R. Nathan. (2010). Flight modes in migrating European Bee-eaters: heart rate may indicate low metabolic rate during soaring and gliding. PLoS One 5:e13956. [PDF]

60
Spiegel, O., and R. Nathan. (2010). Incorporating density-dependence into the directed dispersal hypothesis. Ecology 91:1538–1548. [PDF]

59
Schurr, F. M., O. Spiegel, O. Steinitz, A. Trakhtenbrot, A. Tsoar, and R. Nathan. (2009). Long-distance seed dispersal. Pages 204-237 in L. Østergaard, editor. Fruit Development and Seed Dispersal. Annual Plant Reviews 38, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford.

58
Kuparinen, A., G. Katul, R. Nathan, and F. M. Schurr. (2009). Increases in air temperature can promote wind-driven dispersal and spread of plants. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 276:3081-3087.[PDF]

57
Nathan, R., J. M. Bullock, O. Ronce, and F. M. Schurr. (2009). Seed dispersal. in Encyclopedia of Life Sciences. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester.

56
Wright, S. J., A. Trakhtenbrot, G. Bohrer, M. Detto, G. G. Katul, N. Horvitz, H. C. Muller-Landau, F. A. Jones, and R. Nathan. 2008. Understanding strategies for seed dispersal by wind under contrasting atmospheric conditions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 105: 19084-19089.[Abstract][PDF]

55
Holyoak, M., R. Casagrandi, R. Nathan, E. Revilla, and O. Spiegel. 2008. Trends and missing parts in the study of movement ecology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 105: 19060-19065. [Abstract][PDF]

54 Nathan, R., W. M. Getz, E. Revilla, M. Holyoak, R. Kadmon, D. Saltz, and P. E. Smouse. 2008. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 105: 19052-19059. [Abstract][PDF][Classified as “hot paper” (most cited papers of the last 2 years) in the
Multidisciplinary
category of ISI’s Web of Science; Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 108 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011]

53 Nathan, R.. 2008. An emerging movement ecology paradigm. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 105: 19050-19051.[PDF] [Highlighted in the journal’s cover photo]

52 Nathan, R., F. Schurr, O. Spiegel, O. Steinitz, A. Trakhtenbrot, and A. Tsoar. 2008. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 23: 638-647.[Abstract] [PDF]
51 Mari, L., R.Casagrandi, M. Gatto, T. Avgar, and R. Nathan. 2008. Movement strategies of seed predators as determinants of plant recruitment patterns. The American Naturalist 172: 694-711.[Abstract][PDF]
50 Avgar, T., N. Horvitz, L. Broitman, and R. Nathan. 2008. How movement properties affect prey encounter rate by ambush versus active predators? The American Naturalist 172: 593-595.[PDF]
49
Bohrer, G., G. G. Katul, R. Nathan, R. L. Walko, and R. Avissar. 2008. Effects of canopy heterogeneity, seed abscission, and inertia on wind-driven dispersal kernels of tree seeds. Journal of Ecology 96: 569-580.[Abstract][PDF]

48 Schurr, F. M., O. Steinitz, and R. Nathan. 2008. Plant fecundity and seed dispersal in spatially heterogeneous environments: models, mechanisms and estimation. Journal of Ecology 96: 628-641.[Abstract][PDF] [Highlighted in the journal’s cover photo]

47 Bullock, J. M., and R. Nathan. 2008. Plant dispersal across multiple scales: linking models and reality. Journal of Ecology 96: 567-568.[Abstract][PDF]

46 Avgar, T., I. Giladi, and R. Nathan. 2008. Linking traits of foraging animals to spatial patterns of plants: social and solitary ants generate opposing patterns of surviving seeds. Ecology Letters 11:224-234.[Abstract][PDF] [Highlighted in the journal’s cover photo]

45 Spiegel, O. and R. Nathan. 2007. Incorporating dispersal distance into the disperser effectiveness framework: frugivorous birds provide complementary dispersal to plants in a patchy environment. Ecology Letters 10: 718–728.[Abstract] [PDF]

44
Nathan, R. 2007. Total dispersal kernels and the evaluation of diversity and similarity in complex dispersal systems. Pages 252-276 in A. J. Dennis, E. W. Schupp, R. J. Green, and D. A. Westcott, editors. Seed Dispersal: Theory and its Application in a Changing World. CAB International, Wallingford, UK.

43
Bronstein, J. L., I. Izhaki, R. Nathan, J. J. Tewksbury, O. Spiegel, A. Lotan, and O. Altstein. 2007. Fleshy-fruited plants and frugivores in desert ecosystems. Pages 148-177 in A. J. Dennis, E. W. Schupp, R. J. Green, and D. A. Westcott, editors. Seed Dispersal: Theory and its Application in a Changing World. CAB International, Wallingford, UK.

42 Van der Veken, S., J. Rogister, K. Verheyen, M. Hermy, and R. Nathan. 2007. Over the (range) edge: a 45-year transplant experiment with the perennial forest herb Hyacinthoides non-scripta. Journal of Ecology 95:343-351.[Abstract] [PDF]

41 Gonzalez-Martinez, S. C., J. Burczyk, R. Nathan, N. Nanos, L. Gil, and R. Alia. 2006. Effective gene dispersal and female reproductive success in Mediterranean maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton). Molecular Ecology 15:4577-4588.[Abstract] [PDF]

40 Troupin, D., R. Nathan, and G. G. Vendramin. 2006. Analysis of spatial genetic structure in an expanding Pinus halepensis population reveals development of fine-scale genetic clustering over time. Molecular Ecology 15: 3617-3630. [Abstract] [PDF]

39
Buckley, Y. M., S. Anderson, C. P. Cattarall, R. T. Corlett, T. Engel, C. R. Gosper, R. Nathan, D. M. Richardson, M. Setter, O. Spiegel, G. Vivan-Smith, F. A. Voigt, J. E. S. Weir, and D. A. Westcott. 2006. Management of plant invasions mediated by frugivore interactions. Journal of Applied Ecology 43: 848–857. [Abstract] [PDF]

38 Nathan R. 2006 . Long distance dispersal of plants. Science 313: 786-788. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 174 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011]

37 Bohrer, G., R. Nathan, and S. Volis. 2005. Effects of long-distance dispersal for metapopulation survival and genetic structure at ecological time and spatial scales. Journal of Ecology 93: 1029–1040. [Abstract] [PDF] [Highlighted in the journal’s cover photo]

36
Neilson, R. P., L. F. Pitelka, A. M. Solomon, R. Nathan, G. F. Midgley, J. M. V. Fragoso, H. Lischke and K. Thompson. Forecasting regional to global plant migration in response to climate change: challenges and directions. BioScience 55: 749-795. [Abstract] [PDF]

35 Katul, G. G., A. Porporato, R. Nathan, M. Siqueira, M. B. Soons, D. Poggi, H. S. Horn, and S. A. Levin. 2005. Mechanistic analytical models for long-distance seed dispersal by wind. The American Naturalist 16: 368-381. [Abstract] [PDF]

34 Nathan, R. and G.G. Katul. 2005. Foliage shedding in deciduous forests lifts up long-distance seed dispersal by wind. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 102: 8251-8256. [Abstract] [PDF] [Supporting Material]
33 Trakhtenbrot, A., R. Nathan, G. Perry, and D. M. Richardson. 2005. The importance of long-distance dispersal in biodiversity conservation. Diversity and Distributions 11: 173-181. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 109 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011]

32 Nathan, R., N. Sapir, A. Trakhtenbrot, G. G. Katul, G. Bohrer, M. Otte, R. Avissar, M. B. Soons, H. S. Horn, M. Wikelski, and S. A. Levin. 2005. Long-distance biological transport processes through the air: can nature's complexity be unfolded in-silico? Diversity and Distributions 11: 131-137. [Abstract] [PDF]

31 Nathan, R. 2005. Long-distance dispersal research: building a network of yellow brick roads. Diversity and Distributions 11: 125-130. [Abstract] [PDF] [Highlighted in the journal’s cover photo]

30 Nathan, R. 2005. Transport phenomena research: journeying towards integration. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 20: 65-66. [PDF]

29 Svoray, T., and R. Nathan. (2005). Dynamic modelling of the effects of  water, temperature and light on tree population spread. Pages 125-135 in P. M. Atkinson, G. M. Foody, S.E. Darby, and F. Wu, editors. GeoDynamics. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, USA.[PDF]

28 Soons, M. B., R. Nathan and G.G. Katul. 2004. Human effects on long-distance wind dispersal and colonization by grassland plants. Ecology 85: 3069-3079. [Abstract] [PDF]
27
Soons, M. B., G.W. Heil, R. Nathan and G.G. Katul. 2004. Determinants of long-distance seed dispersal in grasslands. Ecology 85: 3056-3068. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 76 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011]

26 Nathan, R. 2004. Integrating multiple components of long-term tree population dynamics: Pine expansion on Mt Pithulim. 10 pp in: M. Arianoutsou (Ed.) MEDECOS X, Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Mediterranean Climate Ecosystems. Rhodes, Greece.

25 Nathan, R., and R. Casagrandi. 2004. A simple mechanistic model of seed dispersal, predation and plant establishment: Janzen-Connell and beyond. Journal of Ecology 92: 733-746. [Abstract] [PDF]
24 Goubitz, S., R. Nathan, D. Roitemberg, A. Shmida, and G. Ne’eman. 2004. Canopy seed bank structure in relation to fire, tree size and density. Plant Ecology 173: 190-201. [Abstract] [PDF]
23 Ne’eman, G., S. Goubitz, and R. Nathan. 2004. Reproductive traits of Pinus halepensis in the light of fire – a critical review. Plant Ecology 171: 69-79. [Abstract] [PDF]

22 Nathan, R., and G. Ne’eman. 2004. Spatiotemporal dynamics of recruitment in Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Miller). Plant Ecology 171: 123-137. [PDF]
21 Levin, S.A., H. C. Muller-Landau, R. Nathan and J. Chave. 2003. Ecology and evolution of seed dispersal: a theoretical perspective. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 34: 575-604. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 177 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011]

20 Nathan, R., G. Perry, J. T. Cronin, A. E. Strand, and M. L. Cain. 2003. Methods for estimating long-distance dispersal. Oikos 103: 261-273. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 153 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011]

19
Cain, M. L, R. Nathan, and S. A. Levin. 2003. Long-distance dispersal. Ecology 84: 1943-1944. [PDF]

18 Higgins, S. I., R. Nathan, and M. L. Cain. 2003. Are long-distance dispersal events usually caused by nonstandard means of dispersal? Ecology 84: 1945-1956. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 147 citations in ISI, 4 August 2011].

17
Higgins, S.I., J.S. Clark, R. Nathan, T. Hovestadt, F. Schurr , J.M.V. Fragoso, M.R. Aguiar, E. Ribbens and S. Lavorel. 2003. Forecasting plant migration rates: managing uncertainties for risk assessment. Journal of Ecology 87:659-669. [Abstract] [PDF]

16
Nathan, R. 2003. Seeking the secrets of dispersal. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 18: 275-276. [PDF]

15
Nathan, R., G. G. Katul, H. S. Horn, S.M. Thomas, R. Oren, R. Avissar, S. W. Pacala, and S. A. Levin. 2002. Mechanisms of long-distance dispersal of seeds by wind. Nature 418: 409-413. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 218 citations in ISI, 1 July 2011]

14 Nathan, R., H. S. Horn, J. Chave, and S. A. Levin. 2002. Mechanistic models for tree seed dispersal by wind in dense forests and open landscapes. Pages 69-82 in: D. J. Levey, W. R. Silva and M. Galetti (Eds.) Seed Dispersal and Frugivory: Ecology, Evolution and Conservation. CAB International, Oxfordshire, UK. [PDF]

13
Shmida, A., O. Fragman, R. Nathan, Z. Shamir and Y. Sapir. 2002. The Red Plants of Israel: a proposal of updated and revised list of plant species protected by the law. Ecologia Mediterranea 28:55-64.

12 Horn, H.S., R. Nathan and S. R. Kaplan. 2001. Long-distance dispersal of tree seeds by wind. Ecological Research 16: 877-885. [Abstract] [PDF]

11 Nathan, R. 2001. The challenges of studying dispersal. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 16: 481-483. [PDF]
10 Nathan, R., U. N. Safriel and I. Noy-Meir. 2001. Field validation and sensitivity analysis of a mechanistic model for tree seed dispersal by wind. Ecology 82: 374-388. [Abstract] [PDF]
9
Nathan, R. 2001. Dispersal biogeography. Pages 127-152 in: S. A. Levin (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Biodiversity. First Edition. Academic Press, San Diego. [PDF] 

[Fully revised and updated in 2011 for the Second Edition of the Encyclopedia of Biodiversity to be published in 2012]

8
Nathan, R., U. N. Safriel, I. Noy-Meir and G. Schiller. 2000. Spatiotemporal variation in seed dispersal and recruitment near and far from Pinus halepensis trees. Ecology 81: 2156-2169. [Abstract] [PDF]
7 Nathan, R. and H. C. Muller-Landau. 2000. Spatial patterns of seed dispersal, their determinants and consequences for recruitment. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 15: 278-285. [Abstract] [PDF] [Classified as “highly cited paper” (most cited papers of the last 10 years) in the Environment category of ISI’s Web of Science; 549 citations in ISI

4 August 2011]

6
Nathan, R. and G. Ne’eman. 2000. Serotiny, seed dispersal and seed predation in Pinus halepensis. Pages 105-118 in: G. Ne’eman and L. Trabaud. (Eds). Ecology, biogeography and management of Pinus halepensis and P. brutia forest ecosystems in the Mediterranean Basin. Backhuys, Leiden, The Netherlands.

5 Nathan, R., U. N. Safriel, I. Noy-Meir and G. Schiller. 1999. Seed release without fire in Pinus halepensis, a Mediterranean serotinous wind-dispersed tree. Journal of Ecology 87:659-669. [Abstract] [PDF]
4 Nathan, R. and Y. L. Werner. 1999. Reptiles and breeding birds on Mt. Hermon: patterns of species richness and altitudinal distribution. Israel Journal of Zoology 45:1-33. [Abstract]
3
Nathan, R., A. Shmida and O. Fragman. 1996. Peripherality and regional rarity are positively correlated: quantitative evidence from the Upper Galilee flora (North Israel). Pages 561-564 in: Y. Steinberger (Ed.), Preservation of our world in the wake of change. Israel Society for Ecology & Environmental Quality Sciences, Jerusalem, Israel. (Awarded as the best student paper in the conference). [PDF]

2
Nathan, R., U. N. Safriel, I. Noy-Meir and G. Schiller. 1996. Samara's aerodynamic properties in Pinus halepensis Mill., a colonizing tree species, remain constant despite considerable variation in morphology. Pages 553-556 in: Y. Steinberger (Ed.), Preservation of our world in the wake of change. Israel Society for Ecology & Environmental Quality Sciences, Jerusalem, Israel. [PDF]

1 Nathan, R., U. N. Safriel and H. Shirihai. 1996. Extinction and vulnerability to extinction at distribution peripheries: an analysis of the Israeli breeding avifauna. Israel Journal of Zoology 42: 353-376. [Abstract]






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Dept. of Evolution, Systematics and Ecology. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Berman bldg. Room 103, Givat Ram, JR 91904, Israel. Tel: 972-(0)2-6585075 Fax: 972-(0)2-6584741
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Last Update:September 26, 2004
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